Burial Arrangements

Please contact Iqbal Patel – 07841 795977 or Idris Patel 07941 874477 to arrange day and time for burial
We can assist with the paperwork to obtain that is required before burial can take place. We shall try and assist as and when and in the manner it is requested to do so.

Some of the information on this page is specific to residents of London and different procedures may apply in other local authorities.

The one thing that is certain to take place in this world is death. Yet, despite the certainty of death, the majority of us are ignorant of the procedures to be filled to ensure a burial takes place speedily and smoothly in accordance with the Islamic Shariah.

The procedures below are basic practical guidelines which will assist anyone facing bereavement. Naturally, next of kin and close relatives will be a state of shock and grief; therefore it is the responsibility of close relatives and friends to assist them with the arrangements for burial.

The following persons should be contacted immediately when death has taken place in the family:

  • The family doctor
  • Necessary relatives and neighbours
  • The Kabrastaan Committee
  • Imam of the local mosque

If Death Occurs at Home - Cause of Death Known

  1. Contact the family general practitioner immediately. Provided the doctor attended the dead person during his last illness and can certify the cause of death he will issue a medical certificate free of charge. It will state the cause of death.
  2. A close relative preferably, a son or brother should take the medical certificate to the Registrar of Births and Deaths of the district/borough where the death took place for registration. He should have with him the following information: the deceased person's NHS medical card (if available), the deceased person’s usual address, the deceased date of birth, town and country of birth, occupation, and date of birth of widow or widower. The Registrar is normally based in the Civic offices or the Town Hall. The Registrar will issue two free certificates.
    • Certificate disposal (green certificate) this certificate should be given to the undertaker as an authorisation for burial.
    • Certificate of Registration of Death - this is for social security purposes and for probate etc. One has to wait for this certificate to be issued. Otherwise it will be posted to your address.

During public holidays or after office hours the certificate of disposal can be obtained from the Registrar of Death from his home. This service is only available in the event of an emergency i.e. if burial needs to take place and offices are closed.

Death Occurs at Home - Cause of Death Unknown

  1. Where the Doctor is unable to certify the cause of death he will report the death to the police who in turn will inform the Coroner (who is responsible for investigating certain deaths)

    The matter will be referred to the Coroner if death occurs in any of the following circumstances.

    • If the deceased person was not attended by a Doctor during his last illness or within 14 days of death
    • If the cause of death is uncertain
    • If death was sudden, violent or caused by an accident
    • If death was caused by industrial disease

    The coroner will probably arrange for a post-mortem examination of the body. The consent of the relatives is not needed for this but they can choose a Doctor to be present. The main purpose for carrying out the post-mortem is to ascertain the cause of death.

  2. The Coroner's office will issue a pink form if the post-mortem shows that death was caused by natural causes. You must take this pink notice to the Registrar of Deaths to obtain a certificate and a Certificate of Disposal and a Registration of Deaths. (See above)
  3. The rest of the procedures are exactly the same as above.
  4. If after the post-mortem examination, the cause of death is uncertain or was due to an accident, violence, or industrial disease then an inquest will be held.

An inquest is an enquiry into the medical cause and circumstance of death. It is held in public and is sometimes with the jury. It is up to the Coroner how to organise the enquiry in a way to best serve the public interest and the interest of the relatives.

Relatives can attend and ask questions to witness with the Coroners permission, or be represented by a lawyer. It may be important to have a lawyer to represent you if death was caused by a road accident or an accident at work, which could lead to a claim of compensation. But if you cannot get legal aid for this, after the inquest the coroner will give free of charge an order for burial or will send a certificate to the Registrar stating the cause of death.

Death Occurs in Hospital - Cause of Death is Known

  1. If the doctor is aware of the cause of death, he will issue a medical certificate so that the disposal certificate can be obtained from the Registrar of Deaths. The Doctor may want to carry out a post-mortem but has to obtain the permission of the nearest relative. If the post-mortem is required purely for the satisfaction of the Doctor or the hospital then the permission is not normally given by the relative in which case they to respect the wished of the close relative. The body will be released to the undertaken to burial in which case procedures outlined above should be followed.
  2. Normally they would transfer the body from the ward to the hospital mortuary, but if arrangements are made swiftly then the body can be collected by the undertaker from the ward and taken to the undertaker’s mortuary.
  3. If is important to bear in mind that the death must be registered in the district/borough of the hospital where they death took place.
  4. Once the medical certificate has been issued by the Doctor and the undertaker has confirmed the time of burial, arrangements should be made for the bathing of the body. The undertaker will carry the body from the hospital to the place of washing and then to the Cemetery for burial. If the body is to be sent out of the country then permission is needed from the Coroner and another certificate is required to accompany the body. Passport of diseased is needed for this.

Death at Home

Contact GP - Police only if suspicious death.

If GP signs Medical Certificate giving cause of death - deceased can be removed. If not available or unwilling to sign. Coroner will collect.

Coroner

Once referred to Coroner the decision will be made whether or not PM will take place.

  • If no PM a 'Part A' will be issued by Coroner - to be collected & taken to Registrar. (Coroner is satisfied)
  • After PM 'Part B' will be issued. Collect and take to Registrar.
  • 'Part C' - If Coroner requires an inquest usually after PM a formal opening of the inquest will take place after which an 'Order for Burial' will be issued. Burial can take place but no registration.

Opening Hours. Monday-Thursday 08:30-5.00pm, Friday 08:30 am - 4:30 pm. Sat. Closed.

On call - Saturday-Sunday - Bank Holidays 8.am-4.pm, either day. Telephone: Police Operation Room, request on duty Coroner officers. For Out of County only.

This service is only for Out of Country only and will not include any death which has a query. After ringing Coroner officer will ring back. He will want as much detail as possible (make sure there is no query which will entail registration being refused if not already registered - such as industrial disease etc) Ask family for Medical cause of death certificate, Passport if available Details required - cause and circumstances of death - Dr signing - flight etc. Coroner’s officer will contact Coroner - give circumstances and arrange appointment. On collection take Out of Country request along with original Death Registration.

Registrar

Registrar will require appropriate medical certificate - diseased medical card - passport - birth - marriage certificate or other form of identification.

For Adults

Certificate of Registration and Green Certificates for Burial will be issued. Registration Certificate alone if going out of county.

For Children

As for adults

For Stillborn

If over 24 weeks and deceased has not shown signs of life a 'Medical Certificate of Stillbirth' will be issued. Birth and death will have to be registered. Registration can only be carried out by mother (out of wedlock) or either parent if married.

Foetus

If under 24 weeks a certificate of 'non viability will be issued. No registration.

Opening Hours

Monday-Friday 09.00am-04:30.pm Sat 09.00am-04.00pm

On Call

Saturdays and Bank Holidays 09.00am-11.59am

When death has occurred outside normal business hours and family wants Sunday burial or are applying for out of county.

The deceased’s body should be washed in a clean, secluded, and private place where clean water and soap are available. Gloves must always be worn when handling and washing the deceased. The body of the deceased should be washed with water and, if available, lotus leaves, or camphor (to be used in the final wash). The steps of the washing should be done at least three times any more odd number of times as necessary to cleanse. Always be mindful of infection control and protecting the person performing the Ghusl. Our Ghusl facility provides disposable gloves, aprons and face masks. Bins for general rubbish as well as Hazardous waste bins for any contaminated waste removed from the body. Only use the hazardous bins for contaminated waste as there is an additional fee incurred to dispose of this separately
Privacy for the deceased is a crucial and important requirement at all times during the ghusl
  • The body of the deceased should be placed on a table or alike, the deceased’s clothes should be removed , and the body should be covered with a sheet of cloth at all times during the ghusl
  • The Auwra (private parts) of the deceased should be covered with a sheet of cloth (The aura of a male is from the belly button to the knee in the presence of males, for the female is the same in the presence of females)
  • The head and the upper body should be raised slightly to insure the washing water with exudations from the body flows down and does not run back to the body
  • remove any items or objects not already removed. These include watches, hospital or mortuary ID tags, wound dressings, IV lines, peg tubes, artificial limbs. If there is any active bleeding or wound discharge then that may be padded and dressed
  • The washer should start washing by saying: "Bismillah" (In the name of Allah)
  • The washer wears gloves or winds a piece of cloth around his hand, and with this he cleans away any impurities from the body using water. Then he should dispose of the gloves
  • The washer should take another pair of gloves, press lightly the stomach of the deceased so as so to expel, if possible, any remnants from it, and then wash the body of all impurities using water. Then he should dispose of the gloves
  • The washer should take another pair of gloves, and wash the covered private parts, then dispose of the gloves
  • The washer should perform wudhu (ablution) for the deceased without inserting the water in the nose and in the mouth. May use a piece of wet cotton wool in a small roll to clean nose and front teeth
  • The washer should clean the body with water and soap (if available), starting from the head (hair, face and beard in men), then the upper right side of the body then the left side, after that the lower right side then the lower left
  • In the case of a female, her hair should be loosened, washed, combed, and be braided in three braids, and placed behind her back
  • the washing should be done three times, or five times, or seven times, as needed, providing that after washing the head, wash the right side before the left, and the upper parts before the lower ones
  • In the last wash, the washer may use camphor, or some perfume with the water
  • After that the body should be dried with clean towel 
  • Then the body should be covered with a clean sheet. The auwra must be kept covered at all times.
  • Get ready to start the shrouding
SPECIAL NOTE : In case the deceased is a female in her menstrual period or have child birth bleeding, padding should be used to prevent blood from leaving the body. NOTE: It is recommended that those who performed the washing should take a bath after performing the ghusl. There is no Islamic teaching of reading of the Quran or of making any special dhikr during the ghusl. All of this is based on authentic Hadith that Um Atiyah narrated that: " When the daughter of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) died, he instructed us:  Wash her three times, or more than that if you feel it is necessary, with water and sidr (good smelling leaves), and then after the last wash apply some camphor to the body , then loosen her hair, wash it, comb it, and make it in three braids laid behind her back " (Bukhari & Muslim)

Shrouding should start immediately after washing the body of the deceased. It is recommended to use white sheets from inexpensive material. Extravagance is not recommended in the Kafan (Shroud). All measurements may vary depending on the stature of the deceased.

The material of the sheet should not have any stitching, not be silk, nor should any gold be used. Our MFS Facility has pre-cut and packed male and female adult kaffans. These are placed and folded in the order of use and so when the pack is opened and unfolded it is already ready to be used in the correct order. We also have a roll of fabric available should you need to cut a specific size.

The Kafan of a male should consist of three white wrapping sheets, and 4 tie ropes
  • Outer sheet - Lifafah
  • Second sheet - Izaar
  • Third sheet - Qamees (shirt)
  • 3-4 ties
  • 2 smaller sheets (satar) used cover the private parts (auwra) one before and the other after ghusl

STEPS OF SHROUDING:

  • The wrapping sheets should be opened and spread out one on the top of the other (if using one of our pre-packed kaffans, this is already done or you)
  • Roll up the front half of the top sheet towards the head - Qamees (shirt)
  • The deceased, covered with a sheet (satar), is lifted and laid on his back on this top sheet (Qamees)
  • The Qamees is then unrolled over the front of the body and once the body is covered then remove the satar (covering sheet)
  • Some scent or perfume or sandal wood paste may be put on those parts of the body upon which one rests during prostration, that is the forehead, nose, hands, knees, and feet
  • If it is possible the deceased’s left hand should be placed on his chest, then put his right hand on the left hand like the way in the Salat (Prayer)
  • The edge of the next sheet (Izaar) is then folded over the deceased right side, then the other edge over his left side.
  • Then the last sheet (Lifafah) should be folded the same way. 
  • These sheets should be fastened with a piece of cloth (tie ropes), one above the head, another under the feet, and two around the body
  • This completes the shrouding for the male
The Kafan of a female should consist of five white garments and 4 ties
  • Outermost sheet - Lifafah
  • Second sheet - Sinaband - to cover from under armpits to thighs
  • Third sheet - Izaar
  • Fourth layer - Qamees
  • Last piece - Orni - to cover head and hair
  • 3-4 ties
  • 2 smaller sheets (satar) used cover the private parts one before and the other after ghusl

STEPS OF SHROUDING:

  • All the sheets should be spread out in layers (if you are using our pre-packed kaffan this is already done as you open the kaffan)
  • Roll up the front half of the top sheet towards the head - Qamees(shirt)
  • The deceased, covered with a sheet (satar), is lifted and laid on her back on this top sheet (Qamees)
  • The Qamees is then unrolled over the front of the body and once the body is covered then remove the satar (covering sheet)
  • Some scent or perfume may be put on those parts of the body upon which one rests during prostration, that is the forehead, nose, hands, knees, and feet.
  • The sinaband (loin cloth) is bound round (acts like underwear).
  • Put the head veil
  • the deceased’s left hand should be placed on her chest, then put her right hand on the left hand like the way in the Salat (Prayer)
  • the edge of the Izaar sheet is folded over the deceased right side, then the other edge over his left side.
  • then the last (Lifafah) sheet should be folded the same way
  • these sheets should be fastened with a piece of cloth (tie ropes), one above the head, another under the feet, and two around the body

When a Muslim dies, it is the responsibility of his family or other Muslims within the local community to wash him according to the Islamic rites of washing the deceased. Usually at least three to four people will be involved with the actual ghusl (washing and shrouding).

The persons who may wash the deceased should :
  • be an adult Muslim, honest and trustworthy person
  • be of the same gender as the deceased ie if the deceased is male, then ONLY males should wash him
  • for a child, either males or females may do the ghusl
  • know the Islamic way of washing the deceased and be able to carry out the ghusl
  • it is recommended that those who performed the washing should make wudhu (ablution)